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Books in the Library at Alexandria

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Directory

  1. The Library of Alexandria - MacLead (Paperback)
  2. The Sand-Reckoner - Bradshaw (Papyrus)
  3. The Sand-Reckoner - Bradshaw (Stone Tablet)
  4. The Works of Archimedes - Heath (Papyrus)
  5. Between Copernicus and Galileo: Christoph Clavius and the Collapse of Ptolemaic Astronomy - Wallace (Digital/HTML Edition
  6. When China Ruled the Seas - Levathes (Paperback)
  7. Zheng He and the Treasure Fleet 1405-1433 - Rozario
  8. 1421: The Year China Discovered America - Menzies (Paperback)
  9. 1421: The Year China Discovered America - Menzies (Hardcover)
  10. 1421: The Year China Discovered America - DVD Image
  11. The Life & Times of Archimedes - Zannos (Papyrus)
  12. Infinite Secrets: The Genius of Archimedes - DVD Image
  13. The Life and Times of Marco Polo - Zannos (Papyrus)
  14. Aristarchus of Samos - Heath (Papyrus)
  15. The pneumatics of Hero of Alexandria - Hero
  16. Hippocrates (Medicine & Culture} - Juanna (Paperback
  17. Hippocrates (Medicine & Culture} - Juanna Hardcover)
  18. Herodotus: The Histories - Herodutus (Paperback)
  19. Plutarch's Lives Volume 1 - Plutarch (Paperback)
  20. Plutarch's Lives, Volume 2 - Plutarch (Paperback)
  21. The Discoverers - Boorstin (Paperback - If you read only one history book in your lifetime, read this one)
  22. Livy - Titus Livy
  23. The Rise of Rome - Titus Livy
  24. Agricola and Germany - Cornelius Tacitus
  25. The War with Hannibal - Titus Livy
    Publius Cornelius Scipio defeated Hannibal at the Battle of Zama
    and won the Second Punic War. See Scipio Books

Between Copernicus and Galileo: Christoph Clavius and the Collapse of Ptolemaic Astronomy. (book reviews) : An article from: Theological Studies [HTML] (Digital)
by William A. Wallace

Book Description
This digital document is an article from Theological Studies, published by Theological Studies, Inc. on September 1, 1995. The length of the article is 97768 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: Between Copernicus and Galileo: Christoph Clavius and the Collapse of Ptolemaic Astronomy. (book reviews)
Author: William A. Wallace
Publication: Theological Studies (Refereed)
Date: September 1, 1995
Publisher: Theological Studies, Inc.
Volume: v56 Issue: n3 Page: p609(1)

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Fibonacci — Leonardo Pisano

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When China Ruled the Seas: The Treasure Fleet of the Dragon Throne, 1405-1433 (Paperback)
by Louise Levathes
"In the millennium that preceded the rise of the first Chinese empire about 1600 B.C., the diverse Yi (and Yue) peoples of eastern and southern…"

From Publishers Weekly
Levathes, a former staff writer for National Geographic , here tells the story of seven epic voyages made by unique junk armadas during the reign of the Chinese emperor Zhu Di. These "treasure ships" under the command of the eunuch admiral Zheng He traded in porcelain, silk, lacquerware and fine-art objects; they sailed from Korea and Japan throughout the Malay archipelago and India to East Africa, and possibly as far away as Australia. Levathes argues that China could have employed its navy—with some 3000 vessels, the largest in history until the present century—to establish a great colonial empire 100 years before the age of European exploration and expansion; instead, the Chinese abruptly dismantled their navy. Levathes describes the political showdown that led to this perverse turn of events, revolving around a clash between the powerful eunuch class and Confucian scholar-officials. Her scholarly study includes a section on the construction of the seagoing junks (the largest had nine masts, was 400 feet long and would have dwarfed Columbus's ships) and provides a look into court life in the Ming dynasty, particularly the relationship between the emperor, his eunuch and his concubines. Illustrated. Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
In the early 1400s China was poised to become the world's premier maritime power. Emperor Zhu Di (who also built Beijing's Forbidden City) planted vast orchards of tung trees to provide oil to seal his huge "treasure ships," which ranged the South China Seas and the Indian Ocean loaded with silks and porcelains traded for gemstones, coral, pepper, and the cobalt used to improve the very porcelains for which his Ming dynasty would become known. But due to shrinking funds, foreign aggressors, and the Confucian distrust of trade and prosperity, the Chinese abruptly abandoned shipbuilding and began their long plummet into isolationism. A former staff writer for National Geographic, Levathes writes history in the praiseworthy tradition of Barbara TJack Shreve, Allegany Community Coll., Cumberland, Md. Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Zheng He and the Treasure Fleet 1405-1433>: A Modern Day Traveller's Guide from Antiquity to the Present (Paperback)
by Paul Rozario
"Growing up in Singapore, I remember reading about Zheng He (pronounced Jung Her) in our beautifully illustrated history textbook…"

Book Description
Admiral Zheng He is a major historical figure in China and a great explorer in the history of navigation. An Admiral under the third emperor of the Ming Dynasty, Zheng He undertook a total of seven epic voyages between 1405 and 1433, spanning over 30 countries throughout the South Pacific and the Indian Ocean. These historic voyages are, to this day, the largest maritime expeditions in world history.

With 200 ships and a crew of 28,000 men, Admiral Zheng He's "Treasure Fleets" set sail on trade and scientific research missions from South China to as far away as East Africa, the Middle East, India, South East Asia, Australia and New Zealand. There has long been speculation that the fleet circumnavigated and mapped the world, including America, a century before Magellan.

While Zheng He and his phenomenal voyages has been the subject of ongoing study for centuries, research on this subject has never been more lively than during the past two decades.

From China to Mombasa and Africa's Swahili Coast, Zheng He and the Treasure Fleet takes us in the wake of Admiral Zheng and his fleet on a 21st Century voyage of discovery, retracing his steps and revisiting his ports of call, to give an enlightened perspective on historical sites and present–day customs with links to the past.

This year commemorates the 600th anniversary of Admiral Zheng He's first voyage in 1405, and witnesses the dawning of many theories about Zheng He's expeditions across the disciplines of history, scholarship, Asian Studies, Chinese and Ming Dynasty scholars exploration, cartography, naval studies, oceanography and engineering.

This book is a timely and groundbreaking work, combining meticulous research with lavish four–color maps, illustrations, prints and photographs. It is a sublime combination of the efforts of celebrated reference writer and author Paul Rozario, a collection of international photographers, and a Singapore–based editorial and production team that has won numerous awards in editorial excellence and design distinction across Asia, the United States and Europe.

About the Author Paul Rozario is a full–time professional published writer and editor who has managed illustrated reference, travel and art book projects since 2000. Books he has authored include Liberia, Bolivia and Libya in the "Countries of the World" series and Fiesta! Tunisia and Fiesta! Kenya in the "Fiesta!" series. He was the editor of the "Destination Dream" series (both English and French editions), including Destination Dream Cuba: Caribbean Enigma, Destination Dream French Polynesia: Pearl of the Pacific and Destination Dream Himalayan Kingdom: Roof of the World. He also acquired Four Centuries of Silver: Silver Adornment in the Qing Dynasty and After for his publishing company. A graduate of Oxford, London and New York Universities, he is an avid traveler who has experienced life in places as far away as Djibouti on the Red Sea and Haiti in the Caribbean.

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1421 : The Year China Discovered America (Paperback)
by Gavin Menzies
"Over ten years ago I stumbled upon an inceedible discovery, a clue hidden in an ancient map which, though it did not lead to buried…"

From Publishers Weekly
A former submarine commander in Britain's Royal Navy, Menzies must enjoy doing battle. The amateur historian's lightly footnoted, heavily speculative re-creation of little-known voyages made by Chinese ships in the early 1400s goes far beyond what most experts in and outside of China are willing to assert and will surely set tongues wagging. According to Menzies's brazen but dull account of the Middle Kingdom's exploits at sea, Magellan, Dias, da Gama, Cabral and Cook only "discovered" lands the Chinese had already visited, and they sailed with maps drawn from Chinese charts. Menzies alleges that the Chinese not only discovered America, but also established colonies here long before Columbus set out to sea. Because China burned the records of its historic expeditions led by Zheng He, the famed eunuch admiral and the focus of this account, Menzies is forced to defend his argument by compiling a tedious package of circumstantial evidence that ranges from reasonable to ridiculous. While the book does contain some compelling claims-for example, that the Chinese were able to calculate longitude long before Western explorers-drawn from Menzies's experiences at sea, his overall credibility is undermined by dubious research methods. In just one instance, when confounded by the derivation of cryptic words on a Venetian map, Menzies first consults an expert at crossword puzzles rather than an etymologist. Such an approach to scholarship, along with a promise of more proof to come in the paperback edition, casts a shadow of doubt over Menzies's discoveries. 32 pages of color illus., 27 maps and diagrams. Book-of-the-Month Club alternate. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist
Menzies makes the fascinating argument that the Chinese discovered the Americas a full 70 years before Columbus. Not only did the Chinese discover America first, but they also, according to the author, established a number of subsequently lost colonies in the Caribbean. Furthermore, he asserts that the Chinese circumnavigated the globe, desalinated water, and perfected the art of cartography. In fact, he believes that most of the renowned European explorers actually sailed with maps charted by the Chinese. Though most historical records were destroyed during centuries of turmoil in the Far East, he manages to cobble together some feasible evidence supporting his controversial conclusions. Sure to cause a stir among historians, this questionable tale of adventure on the high seas will be hotly debated in academic circles. Margaret Flanagan
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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1421: The Year China Discovered America (Hardcover)
by Gavin Menzies

From Publishers Weekly
A former submarine commander in Britain's Royal Navy, Menzies must enjoy doing battle. The amateur historian's lightly footnoted, heavily speculative re-creation of little-known voyages made by Chinese ships in the early 1400s goes far beyond what most experts in and outside of China are willing to assert and will surely set tongues wagging. According to Menzies's brazen but dull account of the Middle Kingdom's exploits at sea, Magellan, Dias, da Gama, Cabral and Cook only "discovered" lands the Chinese had already visited, and they sailed with maps drawn from Chinese charts. Menzies alleges that the Chinese not only discovered America, but also established colonies here long before Columbus set out to sea. Because China burned the records of its historic expeditions led by Zheng He, the famed eunuch admiral and the focus of this account, Menzies is forced to defend his argument by compiling a tedious package of circumstantial evidence that ranges from reasonable to ridiculous. While the book does contain some compelling claims-for example, that the Chinese were able to calculate longitude long before Western explorers-drawn from Menzies's experiences at sea, his overall credibility is undermined by dubious research methods. In just one instance, when confounded by the derivation of cryptic words on a Venetian map, Menzies first consults an expert at crossword puzzles rather than an etymologist. Such an approach to scholarship, along with a promise of more proof to come in the paperback edition, casts a shadow of doubt over Menzies's discoveries. 32 pages of color illus., 27 maps and diagrams. Book-of-the-Month Club alternate. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist
Menzies makes the fascinating argument that the Chinese discovered the Americas a full 70 years before Columbus. Not only did the Chinese discover America first, but they also, according to the author, established a number of subsequently lost colonies in the Caribbean. Furthermore, he asserts that the Chinese circumnavigated the globe, desalinated water, and perfected the art of cartography. In fact, he believes that most of the renowned European explorers actually sailed with maps charted by the Chinese. Though most historical records were destroyed during centuries of turmoil in the Far East, he manages to cobble together some feasible evidence supporting his controversial conclusions. Sure to cause a stir among historians, this questionable tale of adventure on the high seas will be hotly debated in academic circles. Margaret Flanagan
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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1421 - The Year China Discovered America (2004)
Edition: 1421 DVD Image

From the Back Cover
1421: Year China Discovered America? Presents a startling journey of adventure and exploration that could turn the conventional view of world history on its head. This fascinating documentary examines the mystery surrounding the sailing exploits of the legendary Admiral Zhen He and his 30 year command of a gigantic Ming fleet. The Chinese court burned all records of Admiral Zhen He's daring voyages and achievements, and unwittingly created a mystery that tantalizes the world 500 years later.

Product Description
This special examines the theories outlined by Gavin Menzies in his best-selling book. An amateur historian and former submarine commander in the British Navy, Menzies poses an argument that could change the way we perceive global history forever — that Chinese admirals discovered America and Chinese junks first circled the earth. Traveling across the continent, the film combines history, science and technology with adventure and exploration

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The Sand-Reckoner (Tom Doherty Associates Book) (Papyrus Edition)
by Gillian Bradshaw
"The box was full of sand…"

See the Hardcover review.

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The Sand-Reckoner (Stone Table Edition)
by Gillian Bradshaw
"The box was full of sand&ehellip;"

From Publishers Weekly
Armed with just a few antique facts, Bradshaw ably recreates the extraordinary life of Archimedes, the great mathematician and engineer who built sophisticated weapons during the first Punic War. Archimedes lived in the Greek city of Syracuse from 287 to 212 B.C., except for a brief but glorious youthful stint in Alexandria, the hub of intellectual life in the classical age. Surrounded by men who share his genius for geometry, the absentminded Archimedes becomes intoxicated by numbers, often scribbling diagrams on tablecloths and staring for hours into a box of sand to calculate grains. After three years, he begrudgingly returns to his hometown with his slave, Marcus, to find his father dying and his city at war with the Romans. Putting his engineering skills to use for the army, Archimedes builds bigger and better catapults, and he is soon being courted for his talent by the good King Hieron. Jealous co-workers and an unexpected betrayal shadow Archimedes's rise to fame as the Archimechanic. But Syracuse is winning the war because of his inventions, and King Hieron gives him the royal treatment in an effort to keep him from accepting a job offer from King Ptolemy of Egypt. Archimedes sets his sights on Delia, King Hieron's half-sister, with whom he shares a love of music, but he must choose between her and the fair city of Alexandria, between a career as a simple engineer and the siren call of pure mathematics. Bradshaw (Island of Ghosts) is skilled at bringing historical figures to life, and this intriguing and entertaining novel of the boyish dreamer who possessed one of the ancient world's most brilliant minds demonstrates her vivid imagination. (Apr.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist
Around the few facts that are known about Archimedes (287?bce–212 bce), well-regarded historical novelist Bradshaw (The Sarmations, 1998) has fashioned an interesting and informative tale of love, war, and family responsibilities. When the young Archimedes is called back to Syracuse after three years in Alexandria, where he studied his beloved mathematics at Ptolemy's museum, he discovers that his father is gravely ill and the city itself is under attack by the Roman army. Archimedes puts his mathematical knowledge and engineering ability at the service of the state, and builds for King Hieron bigger and more deadly catapults than had ever been seen before, thus helping the king broker a treaty with the Roman commander Claudius. Two subplots are woven into the novel's main thread: the growing love between Archimedes and King Hieron's sister, and the difficult situation that Marcus, Archimedes' Roman slave, finds himself in as he discovers that his brother is one of the Roman soldiers captured by the Syracusan army. While Bradshaw's book lacks the emotional complexity found in the historical novels of Rosemary Sutcliffe, her novel provides a vivid picture of the life and times of the greatest mathematical and engineering mind in the classical world. Nancy Pearl

Return to papyrus edition above.

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The Works of Archimedes (Paperback)
by Sir Thomas Heath (Translator)

Book Description
The complete works of antiquity's great geometer appear here in a highly accessible English translation by a distinguished scholar. Remarkable for his range of thought and his mastery of treatment, Archimedes addressed such topics as the famous problems of the ratio of the areas of a cylinder and an inscribed sphere; the measurement of a circle; the properties of conoids, spheroids, and spirals; and the quadrature of the parabola. This edition offers an informative introduction with many valuable insights into the ancient mathematician's life and thought as well as the views of his contemporaries. Modern mathematicians, physicists, science historians, and logicians will find this volume a source of timeless fascination. Unabridged reprint of the classic 1897 edition, with supplement of 1912.

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The Life and Times of Archimedes (Biography from Ancient Civilizations) (Library Binding)
by Susan Zannos
"Once upon a time in a beautiful island kingdom, a wealthy ruler wanted to make a special sacrifice to thank the gods for his good…"

Book Description
Archimedes was one of the greatest mathematicians and inventors of the ancient world. His native city was Syracuse on the island of Sicily. When he was a young man, Archimedes was sent to study in Alexandria. There he met other brilliant mathematicians who became his friends. Even after they parted, they wrote to each other sending the problems and theorems they were working on. Back in Syracuse, King Hiero II asked him to use his mathematical genius to create practical solutions and inventions. The tools and weapons that Archimedes invented made him famous throughout the ancient world, and some such as levers and pulleys are still used today.

About the Author
Susan Zannos has been a lifelong educator, having taught at all levels, from preschool to college, in Mexico, Greece, Italy, Russia, and Lithuania, as well as in the United States. She has published a mystery Trust the Liar (Walker and Co.) and Human Types: Essence and the Enneagram (Samuel Weiser). Her book, Human Types, was recently translated into Russian, and in 2003 Susan was invited to tour Russia and lecture about her book. Another book she wrote for young adults, Careers in Education (Mitchell Lane) was selected for the New York Public Library�s "Books for the Teen Age 2003 List." She has written many books for children, including Chester Carlson and the Development of Xerography and The Life and Times of Ludwig van Beethoven (Mitchell Lane). When not traveling, Susan lives in the Sierra Foothills of Northern California.

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The Life and Times of Marco Polo (Biography from Ancient Civilizations) (Library Binding)
by Susan Zannos
"Marco woke early with a strange feeling of excitement…"

Book Description
Marco Polo, the first European to travel to China and return to write about his adventures, was born in Venice in 1254. Marco�s father had left on a journey to Asia before the boy was born. Marco did not see his father and uncle, Niccol� and Maffeo Polo, until fifteen years later. In 1271 the three Polos left Venice and headed for the court of Kublai Khan in eastern China. The journey took them more than three years�they arrived in 1275. Marco Polo became a favorite of the Great Kahn, and was sent on important missions all over the Mongol Empire. Marco and his father and uncle served Kublai Kahn for 17 years. When they returned to Venice in 1295, Marco became the captain of a merchant ship and was captured and imprisoned in Genoa. While in prison he and another prisoner who was a writer of romances wrote the story of Marco Polo�s adventures.

About the Author
Susan Zannos has been a lifelong educator, having taught at all levels, from preschool to college, in Mexico, Greece, Italy, Russia, and Lithuania, as well as in the United States. She has published a mystery Trust the Liar (Walker and Co.) and Human Types: Essence and the Enneagram (Samuel Weiser). Her book, Human Types, was recently translated into Russian, and in 2003 Susan was invited to tour Russia and lecture about her book. Another book she wrote for young adults, Careers in Education (Mitchell Lane) was selected for the New York Public Library�s "Books for the Teen Age 2003 List." She has written many books for children, including Chester Carlson and the Development of Xerography and The Life and Times of Ludwig van Beethoven (Mitchell Lane). When not traveling, Susan lives in the Sierra Foothills of Northern California.

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Aristarchus of Samos: The Ancient Copernicus (Dover Books on Astronomy) (Paperback)
by Sir Thomas Heath

Book Description
This classic traces the history of Greek astronomy to the writing of Aristarchus, who anticipated by two millennia Copernicus' revolutionary theory of the orbital motion of the earth.

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The pneumatics of Hero of Alexandria: From the original Greek (Unknown Binding)
by Hero
Limited Availability — Out–of–print
Click on Amazon graphic to check current availability

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Hippocrates (Medicine and Culture) (Paperback)
by Jacques Jouanna, Malcolm B. DeBevoise (Translator)
"Hippocrates of Cos, the Asclepiad." Thus the celebrated physician was designated during his lifetime to distinguish him from others called Hippocrates, for this was a…"

See the review below for the Hardover edition.

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Hippocrates (Medicine and Culture) (Hardcover)
by Jacques Jouanna, Malcolm B. DeBevoise (Translator)
"Hippocrates of Cos, the Asclepiad." Thus the celebrated physician was designated during his lifetime to distinguish him from others called Hippocrates, for this was a…"

From The New England Journal of Medicine, December 2, 1999
The study of medical history has vanished from most U.S. medical schools. Is this a surprise? The number of discoveries in molecular biology has exploded. The field of biochemistry grows relentlessly. Newly defined diseases are described in detail. Medical technology demands greater knowledge in interpreting its findings. These expanding fields and others compete for time in the curriculum. Why keep what has no practical value today or for tomorrow?

A case for medical history in the curriculum cannot be made easily by arguing that it will give medical students a better grasp of modern medical science or of modern practice. Is there a case to be made for medical history at least in the self-education of students and physicians? In 1941, Alan Gregg suggested a way to look at this question ("Humanism and Science." Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine 1941;17:83-99). He commented that "the humanist is not interested in the past merely because it is past. As the statistician likes a long series, not a short one, the humanist similarly likes the long accumulations from the past to illustrate the nature of man.... `Plus ca change; plus ca reste."'

If we assume that Gregg, who was in the field of medicine himself, is speaking of physicians as humanists, he implies that there may be aspects of medical knowledge and practice that are much the same today as in the past, unless "the nature of man" has changed radically. He also seems to imply that we can learn from medical history whether what we believe today about the essence of the practice of medicine -- the qualities needed in a physician, the needs of patients, the relation of patient and physician, the finding of evidence, and the basic methods of practice -- can be confirmed by a long view of medicine's past. If any aspects of what was seen in the practice of medicine 2000 years ago are still seen today, then these aspects are enduring foundations of practice. Here lies the main value of Jouanna's Hippocrates for medical readers.

The title Hippocrates is far from describing what Jouanna covers. A subtitle such as "Hippocratic Medicine in Ancient Greece" could have made clearer the scope of his book. Hippocrates (460-c. 375 b.c.) is the subject of only the opening three chapters. Here Jouanna assesses the historical evidence relevant to identifying the physician and teacher named Hippocrates, whom we associate with the island of Cos and the Hippocratic oath. Next comes a chapter that considers who probably wrote which documents among those that, as a group, are titled the Hippocratic Collection.

Jouanna then moves into three chapters on the Hippocratic knowledge of medicine in the fifth, fourth, and third centuries b.c. and how it was applied in practice.

One might ask how so much can be known of physicians' knowledge and beliefs and of the day-to-day conduct of practice from such a distance in time. It is clear that much in Jouanna's descriptions is inference, but the inferences are indeed reasonable. They are based in part on the surviving Hippocratic literature itself but also on such sources as Aristophanes, Euripides, Plato, Socrates, and the later Galen. All of this documentation is cited, and full references are given in the Notes section that follows Appendix 3. In these chapters, the reader can compare the nature of medical knowledge and practice in ancient Greece with our knowledge and practice. This will be the most valuable part of Jouanna's book for medical readers who wish to see what in medicine has endured from the Hippocratic era to our times. They will see that despite radical changes in medical science, much in medical practice and ethics has remained constant.

From this focus on Hippocratic medicine, Jouanna goes on to consider the place of Hippocratic concepts in the wider sphere of contemporary Greek science and philosophy. Finally, he returns to the influence of Hippocratic medicine and its associated documents on medicine in the following centuries. This influence, in its scientific aspects, persisted for almost two millennia, into the 18th and early 19th centuries.

This English edition will be notably valuable as a guide for all Anglophone medical students and physicians who wish to read for themselves any of the documents in the Hippocratic Collection. As Appendix 3, "The Treatises of the Hippocratic Collection," makes clear, these documents cannot all be considered to have come from the hand of a historical person named Hippocrates. But that is irrelevant to the question of the value of reading them. This appendix describes their content, their probable authorship and date, and where they can be found in authoritative sources. One source not mentioned is that most likely to be found in U.S. medical-school libraries: the collection translated into English by Francis Adams, which was published in 1849 and has been reprinted at least twice since World War II. Mention of the Adams collection was omitted probably because it includes only 17 documents and because its introduction by Emerson Crosby Kelly does little more than discuss probable authorship.

The Notes section lists the English translations in the Loeb Classical Library set of eight volumes (published by Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass.). The many quotations from Hippocratic works in the English edition of Hippocrates were taken by the translator from the Loeb editions.

By now I hardly need to say that I unreservedly recommend Jouanna's highly readable, thoroughly documented survey of Hippocratic medicine in pre-Hellenistic Greece -- its origins, concepts, and influence. The influence of Hippocratic medicine on desiderata in practice and, especially, on medical ethics persists today, even though today's practitioners may be unaware that at least some of what they believe is Hippocratic. This survey should be read by all who would like to understand the foundations, laid more than two millennia ago, of today's medicine.

Reviewed by Edward Huth, M.D.
Copyright © 1999 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved. The New England Journal of Medicine is a registered trademark of the MMS.

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Herodotus: The Histories: New Translation, Selections, Backgrounds, Commentaries (Norton Critical Editions) (Paperback)
by Herodotus
Walter Blanco, Jennifer Tolbert Roberts (Editor)

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Plutarch's Lives Volume 1 (Modern Library Classics)
by Plutarch, Arthur Hugh Clough (Editor), James Atlas (Introduction), John Dryden (Translator)
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Plutarch's Lives, Volume 2 (Modern Library Classics)
by Plutarch, Arthur Hugh Clough (Editor), James Atlas (Introduction), John Dryden (Translator)
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Review

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The Discoverers
by Daniel J. Boorstin
Average Customer Review:
Many new and used from less than $1

Review — Amazon.com
Perhaps the greatest book by one of our greatest historians, The Discoverers is a volume of sweeping range and majestic interpretation. To call it a history of science is an understatement; this is the story of how humankind has come to know the world, however incompletely ("the eternal mystery of the world," Einstein once said, "is its comprehensibility"). Daniel J. Boorstin first describes the liberating concept of time--"the first grand discovery"--and continues through the age of exploration and the advent of the natural and social sciences. The approach is idiosyncratic, with Boorstin lingering over particular figures and accomplishments rather than rushing on to the next set of names and dates. It's also primarily Western, although Boorstin does ask (and answer) several interesting questions: Why didn't the Chinese "discover" Europe and America? Why didn't the Arabs circumnavigate the planet? His thesis about discovery ultimately turns on what he calls "illusions of knowledge." If we think we know something, then we face an obstacle to innovation. The great discoverers, Boorstin shows, dispel the illusions and reveal something new about the world.

Although The Discoverers easily stands on its own, it is technically the first entry in a trilogy that also includes The Creators and The Seekers. An outstanding book--one of the best works of history to be found anywhere.
--John J. Miller
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly
In Boorstin's 1983 bestseller The Discoverers , the achievements of Galileo, Columbus, Darwin, Gutenberg and Freud emerged as upwellings of creativity and courage, ingenious acts of revolt against ingrained habit. This richly illustrated two-volume edition reveals the world as known to the discovers themselves. We see the tools of discovery--Egyptian obelisks, early clocks, Leeuwenhoek's microscope, Mercator's maps, botanical drawings from James Cook's voyages--and glimpse the social, cultural and political background, made concrete in 550 pictures including paintings, sculpture, engravings and architecture. A photograph of 15th-century cast bronze type from Korea underscores an Eastern invention that could have changed the course of printing, perhaps of science and culture. In a feast for the mind and eye, itself a delightful adventure in discovery, Boorstin, librarian of Congress emeritus, profiles--and places in context--scores of innovators who broke with dogma and tradition.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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The Library of Alexandria
by Roy MacLeod (Editor)
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Libraries and Culture
This is a valuable addition to the literature on the Alexandrian library... --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review
"Fascinating… [and] … should appeal to the general as well as the academic reader." …The Anglo-Hellenic Review

"Informative, assiduously researched and exhaustively stimulating." … Library Review

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Infinite Secrets: The Genius of Archimedes (2003)
DVD Image

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Livy
by Titus Livy,
Stephen Oakley (Preface),
Aubrey De Selincourt (Translator)
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Book Description
With stylistic brilliance and historical imagination, the first five books of Livy's monumental history of Rome record events from the foundation of Rome through the history of the seven kings, the establishment of the Republic and its internal struggles, up to Rome's recovery after the fierce Gallic invasion of the fourth century bc. Livy vividly depicts the great characters, legends, and tales, including the story of Romulus and Remus. Reprinting Robert Ogilvie's lucid 1971 introduction, this highly regarded edition now boasts a new preface, examining the text in light of recent Livy scholarship, informative maps, bibliography, and an index.

Translated by Aubrey de Sélincourt with an introduction by Robert Ogilvie.

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The Rise of Rome
by Livy,
T. J. Luce, Translator
Average Customer Review: ∗∗∗∗∗ Usually ships in 24 hours

From a teenage eviewer
Yes I am only 14 years old but listen to what I have to say.I am in 8th grade,and have always found the roman empire fasinating.So one day I asked my teacher how the roman empire started.Of corse I know the mith,Romulus and Remus were rased by wolfs and sarted rome on the 7th hill.But I wanted to know the truth.So my teacher gave me the book The Rise of Rome.It anserd all of my questions and I gained new knowledge and a better under standing of the roman empire.I was reading a review hear at amason and it said the book was awful because it had inadequet translations,like useing new age frases insted of old world words.Well DUHHHHHH!!!!! This is the new world.That is not a good enogh reason of why not to read the book.It dosnt matter how the book is transilated,as long as the meaning and story is the same.So for all of you who are intrested in the roman empire I highly recomend this book.

Book Description
The first five books of Livy's history of early Rome recount the great stories and moments of Roman history. From Romulus and Remus, to the rape of Lucretia, to Horatius at the bridge, Livy's massive work immortalizes the events which both defined early Roman civilization and helped to shape our cultural heritage. This new annotated translation includes both maps and an index, making it the most complete and up-to-date edition available.

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Agricola and Germany (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
by Cornelius Tacitus,
Anthony Birley, Editor
"It was the custom in past times to relate famous men's deeds and characters for posterity…"

Book Description
Cornelius Tacitus, Rome's greatest historian and the last great writer of classical Latin prose, produced his first two books in AD 98, after the assination of the Emperor Domitian ended fifteen years of enforced silence. Much of Agricola, which is the biography of Tacitus' late father-in-law Julius Agricola, is devoted to Britain and its people, since Agricola's claim to fame was that as governor for seven years he had completed the conquest of Britain, begun four decades earlier. Germany provides an account of Rome's most dangerous enemies, the Germans, and is the only surviving example of an ethnographic study from the ancient world. Each book in its way has had immense influence on our perception of Rome and the northern barbarians. This edition reflects recent research in Roman-British and Roman-German history and includes newly discovered evidence on Tacitus' early career.

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The War with Hannibal
by Titus Livius Livy,
Aubrey De Selincourt (Editor)
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Customer Revoew
The great Roman historian Livy tells a story as interesting as that of the American Civil War. The Second Punic War was a great crisis in Roman history. This book starts with the uneasy peace after the First Punic War between Rome and Carthage. Rome won that war. Carthage swore revenge, and Hannibal devoted his life to conquering his bitter enemy. He invaded Italy via Rome and the Alps with his elephants. No Roman army could stay in the field against his Carthaginians. A Roman consul named Fabius persuaded the Romans not to give battle, and for twenty years Hannibal roamed wherever he liked in Italy. But he wasn't strong enough to capture Rome, and there were Roman generals such as Marcellus who were able to defeat him partially. Meanwhile in Spain a young Roman general whose father and uncle had been killed by Hannibal devoted his life to defeating Hannibal. But not by fighting Hannibal in Italy. Rather, by first conquering Spain, then invading Africa, so Hannibal had to depart Italy, as it turned out forever, to defend his homeland. In Africa, at Zama, Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal. Scipio became the first of the great Romans who broke the mould of the Republican conventions. His family was instrumental in bringing Greek culture to Italy. Was this good for Rome? It was inevitable. The historian Livy wrote in the times of Augustus, about the time of Christ. Livy is not considered the best of historians, he's more interested in gripping narrative than in careful checking of sources. He writes in the annalistic format, that is, one year at a time. Livy wrote two hundred years after the events; it'd be like a modern historian describing the American Revolution. But he is Roman, and the flavor he imparts to events is very different from that of a modern day historian. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in thrilling history or in Rome.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 712 pages
  • li>Publisher: Penguin Classics; Reprint edition (July 30, 1965) li>Language: English li>ISBN: 014044145X li>Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 1.1 inches li>Shipping Weight: 14.7 ounces. (View shipping rates and policies) li>Average Customer Review: ∗∗∗∗ based on 15 reviews.



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